Museum of Rural Architecture

Museum of Rural Architecture

 

In 1998 the Museum of Mining in Příbram bought from the Lobkowicz family a piece of land covering 3 hectares within the cadastre of the municipality of Vysoký Chlumec.
The following year, construction of the Museum of Rural Architecture of the Central Vltava River Region, as a branch of the Museum of Mining in Příbram, started. The most endangered types of folk buildings, which would otherwise have been ruined in their original site, are transferred to this museum.
The farmsteads, small farmers and cotter's buildings, farmhouses, water-powered technical buildings, and small religious buildings dating back to the 18th century through to the beginning of the 20th century are carefully arranged within the natural area of the creek valley. In the final stage of the project, the transfer and reconstruction of about 20 buildings is planned. House No. 4 from Obděnice near Petrovice was the first building to be transferred. Two timbered granaries originally belonging to homestead No. 2 in the village of Počepice near Vysoký Chlumec were added in 2001. In the same year the Museum of Mining in Příbram acquired a disassembled water-powered sawmill originating from Dolní Sloupnice village.
In 2002 the sawmill roofing was finished, and then over the next three years the technology was assembled, including a new oak mill-wheel, which was needed to ensure full functionality of the sawmill. By finishing this project, this water sawmill has become the second mechanism of its kind situated in an open-air museum in the Czech Republic.
Without question, the disassembly, transfer, and reconstruction of the oldest building, house No. 10 from Mašov at Petrovice, dating back to 1739 as indicated on the beam in the house chamber, was the greatest investment in the course of creating the museum during 2004 and 2005.
The collecting activities of the museum are focused on machinery, tools and implements, including folk interior furnishings. Acquired objects should also reflect the social breakdown of the village population living in the Central Vltava Region during the late 19th and early 20th century.

At present, visitors to the Vysoký Chlumec Museum can see nine buildings, seven of which are open for visitors to see the interior or specialized exhibitions. One new specialized exhibition maps the folk tradition of Saint Jan Nepomucký cult within the area of the Příbram and Sedlčany Regions. An exhibition in the timbered granary shows some types of tools and implements related to grain and flour processing and storage. A small bee-keeping exhibition is situated in the apiary originating from Sedlčany; this exhibition was completed with 12 renovated beehives acquired in Rovina village at Počepice.